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“No Disparate Impact” Approach

“No Disparate Impact” Approach Generally, the most important issue regarding discrimination in organizations is the effect of employment policies and procedures, regardless of employer intent. Disparate impact occurs when a substantial under representation of protected class members is evident in employment decisions. The Uniform Guidelines identify one approach in the following statement: “These guidelines do not require a user to…

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Conduct Internal Investigation

Conduct Internal Investigation  A thorough internal investigation of the facts and circumstances of the claim should be conducted. Some firms use outside legal counsel to conduct these investigations in order to obtain a more objective view. Once the investigative data have been obtained, then a decision about the strength or weakness of the employer’s case…

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Concurrent Validity

Concurrent Validity Concurrent means “at the same time.” As shown in Figure 4-9 when an employer. measures concurrent validity, a test is given to current employees -and the scores are correlated with their performance ratings, determined by such measures as accident rates, absenteeism records, and supervisory performance appraisals. The reason it is called concurrent is because the job performance…

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EEO Records Retention

EEO Records Retention  All employment records must be maintained as required by the EEOC. Such records include application forms and records concerning hiring. promotion. demotion. transfer. layoff. termination. rates of pay or other terms of compensation. and selection for training and apprenticeship. Even application forms or test papers completed by unsuccessful applicants may be requested.…

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Annual Reporting Form

Annual  Reporting Form The basic report that must be filed with the EEOC is the annual report form EEO-l. The following employers must file this report: All employers with 100 or more employees. except state and local governments Subsidiaries of other companies where total employees equal 100 Federal contractors with at least employees and contracts of $50.000 or more…

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Compliance Investigative Stages

Compliance Investigative Stages In ‘a typical’ situation, an EEO complaint goes through several stages before the compliance process is completed. First, the charges are filed by an individual, a group of individuals, or their representative. A charge must be filed withiIi’180 days of when the alleged discriminatory action occurred. Then the EEOC staff reviews the specifics of the . charges…

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Applicant Flow Data

Applicant Flow Data Under EEO Newsstand regulations, employers may be required to show that they do not discriminate in the recruiting and selection of members of protected classes. Because collection’of racial data on application and other pre-employment records is not permitted, the EEOC allows employers to use a “visual” surveyor a separate applicant flow form that is not used…

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EEO Policy Statement

EEO Policy Statement It is crucial that all employers have a written EEO policy statement This policy should be widely communicated by “posting it on bulletin boards, printing it in employee handbooks, reproducing it in organizational newsletters, and reinforcing it in training programs. The contents of the policy should clearly state the organizational commitment to equal employment, and incorporate…

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Construct Validity

Construct Validity Construct validity shows a relationship between an abstract characteristic inferred from research and job performance. Researchers who study behavior have given various personality characteristics names, such Ai,. introversion, aggression; and dominance. These are called constructs. Other co~on constructs for which tests have been devised include creativity, leadership potential, and interpersonal sensitivity. Because a hypothetical construct is used as  predictor…

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PredIctive Validity

PredIctive Validity To measure predictive validity, test results of applicants are compared with their subsequent job performance. Success on the job is measured by such factors as absenteeism, accidents, errors, and performance appraisals. If those employees who had one year of experience at the “time of hire demonstrate better performance than those without such experience, ” as calculated by statistical…

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